Hula Hoop Difficult Challenge

I have a challenge for anyone who considers themselves an expert hula hoop twirler. I am not sure that ANYONE is SMART ENOUGH to meet this challenge!

It is simple! Use a standard hula hoop, and get about one-foot length of a scrap garden hose. Slit the garden hose segment down one side. Then spread the hose segment apart so that it can fit over the hula hoop.

For nearly all sized hula hoops and hose segments, the fit should be snug enough so that the segment does not slide around the hula hoop. But IF the fit is bad, some duct tape could be used to tape the hose segment to a fixed position on the hula hoop.

Why is this so different? The WEIGHT of the hula hoop is now asymmetric! Instead of CONSISTENTLY moving to keep the hoop up, things are now VERY different!

Public Service
Categories
Self-Sufficiency - Many Suggestions

Environmental Subjects

Scientific Subjects

Advanced Physics

Social Subjects

Religious Subjects

Public Services Home Page

Main Menu
E-mail
In other words, the person has to THINK about where the additional weight is (which fairly quickly revolves around the person, so the dynamics is constantly changing). There are times when ADDITIONAL wiggle is necessary and other times when less wiggle is appropriate.

Between all the new and dynamic variables, an extreme amount of concentration is needed to always be aware of the added weight to know how to change the amount of wiggle AT THAT INSTANT!

I have serious doubt whether any person is smart enough to do it successfully!

It IS possible to do this with a SMALL piece of hose, such as an inch or two, because then the normal hula hoop wiggles can keep it going.

I hope to be proven wrong!


This presentation was first placed on the Internet in April 2012.

This page - - - - is at
This subject presentation was last updated on - -



Link to the Public Services Home Page

http://mb-soft.com/index.html



Link to the Public Services Main Menu

http://mb-soft.com/index.html



E-mail to: http://mb-soft.com/index.html


C Johnson, Theoretical Physicist, Physics Degree from Univ of Chicago